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Checking In

Hello! Just wanted to check in and let you all know that I’m doing great. The little one is just fine and is due in the next few weeks. We’ve been busily getting ready over the last few months. Being on LOA has been really nice… I’ve been enjoying sleeping in almost every day, especially knowing that it’s my last chance to do so for a very very long time. Anyway, here’s a little story submission from awhile ago that I’m getting around to posting now. Enjoy!

In July of 2005, when I was 24, I was diagnosed with a pituitary tumor. The following November I underwent surgery for it. I was told before surgery that I may or may not end up in ICU afterwards, but that I shouldn’t be surprised if I did. I had a wonderful surgeon (almost a year later, it still looks like he got all of the tumor), but unfortunately developed a roaring case of diabetes insipidus post-op. Instead of the expected day in ICU, I was there for three.

I don’t remember much about those three days. I had a foley, and I remember that I wasn’t allowed out of bed at all. I remember how noisy the ICU was, especially during shift changes, and I remember all of the beeps. I have vague memories of Respiratory Therapy being called for the first day, because I was having trouble breathing due to my packed nose. Mostly I recall that the room was dark and I didn’t want the window blinds opened, and I didn’t want the TV on.

The biggest memory I have, though, is how my day nurse, Kevin, took care of me. He always had a joke and a smile for me, and he always made sure that he was close-by during visiting hours in case my parents had questions. And I remember how on the third day, someone asked him how I was doing… I don’t know who it was. His answer, “She isn’t smiling anymore.” That just wasn’t acceptable to him. He came in, he opened the blinds on the windows, and he turned the TV on. He put it on a John Wayne movie that was halfway through, and he went to go get me something to eat. When he came back, I was still watching the John Wayne movie, and he told me, “You know, you can change the channel!” I grinned and asked him what was wrong with John Wayne, and he grinned back and said, “Nothing, but he walks funny.” It was the exact same answer that my best friend gave me a month later when I recounted the experience.

That same day I was moved out of ICU, and 4 days later they finally sent me home. I hate to think what things would have been like if Kevin hadn’t made such an effort to make me smile and to really take care of me. I’m tearing up right now, just thinking about it.

I just wanted to tell ya’ll my story, so that you can know that there’s one more person out there who truly appreciates everything you do. It’s amazing the difference that one person can make in what could otherwise be a pretty miserable experience.

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you enjoy the sleep ins, soon, sleep will be such a luxury…but all worth it:)



So, what brought you to the hospital today?

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Alltop. I don't know how I got there either.


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    Profile for geenaRN

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  • profileI am Gina. I have been a nurse for 15 years, first in med/surg, then CVICU, inpatient dialysis, CCU and now hospice. This blog is about my experiences as a nurse, and the experiences of others in the healthcare system - patients, nurses, doctors, paramedics. We all have stories!

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